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Outbreaks, the sociology of collective behavior by Jerry D. Rose

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Published by Free Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Collective behavior

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJerry D. Rose.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHM251 .R775 1982
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 278 p. ;
Number of Pages278
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3789510M
ISBN 100029267900
LC Control Number81067439

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[ [ [ Outbreaks: The Sociology of Collective Behavior[ OUTBREAKS: THE SOCIOLOGY OF COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR ] By Rose, Jerry D. (Author)Jan Paperback [Jerry D. Rose] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Outbreaks: The Sociology of Collective Behavior[ OUTBREAKS: THE SOCIOLOGY OF COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR ] By Rose. Collective behavior is noninstitutionalized activity in which several people voluntarily engage. There are three different forms of collective behavior: crowd, mass, and public. There are three main theories on collective behavior. The first, the emergent-norm perspective, emphasizes the importance of social norms in crowd behavior. Rose brings the subject alive with numerous examples of collective behavior, from the panic created by Orson Welles's "Martian invasion" broadcast to the eruption of Mount St. Helens, the Italian earthquake, the Miami riots, the Attica prison uprising, the purges in revolutionary Iran, and the growth of Brand: Jerry D Rose. Sociologist Neil Smelser suggested that outbreaks of collective behavior were the results of a step-by-step process. That is, in order for collective behavior to happen, certain things had to happen in a certain order. These "certain things" he called the Six Preconditions for Collective Behavior.

Learn collective behavior sociology with free interactive flashcards. Choose from different sets of collective behavior sociology flashcards on Quizlet. Start studying Sociology- Collective Behavior. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. The expression collective behavior was first used by Franklin Henry Giddings () and employed later by Robert E. Park and Burgess (), Herbert Blumer (), Ralph Turner and Lewis Killian (), and Neil Smelser () to refer to social processes and events which do not reflect existing social structure (laws, conventions, and institutions), but which emerge in a "spontaneous" way. COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOUR • The term "collective behavior" was first used by Robert E. Park, and employed definitively by Herbert Blumer, to refer to social processes and events which do not reflect existing social structure (laws, conventions, and institutions), but which emerge in a "spontaneous" Size: 65KB.

Definition: Collective behavior is a type of social behavior that occurs in crowds or , mobs, mass hysteria, fads, fashions, rumor, and public opinion are all examples of collective behavior. It is argued that people tend to surrender their individuality and moral judgment in crowds and give in to the hypnotic powers of leaders who shape crowd behavior as they : Ashley Crossman. OUTBREAK! THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF EXTRAORDINARY SOCIAL BEHAVIOR is an authoritative reference on a broad range of topics: collective behavior, deviance, social and perceptual psychology, sociology, history, folklore, religious studies, political science, social anthropology, gender studies, critical thinking, and mental health. Collective behavior can be observed in many forms. In the view of sociologist Neil Smelser, “collective behavior is the relatively spontaneous and unstructured behavior of a group of people who are reacting to a common influence in an ambiguous situation”. (Stolley, ) Other sociologists. Remember that collective behavior is a noninstitutionalized gathering, whereas collective action is based on a shared interest. McPhail’s theory focused primarily on the processes associated with crowd behavior, plus the lifecycle of gatherings. He identified several instances of convergent or collective behavior, as shown on the chart below.